Flightcare

FlightCare helicopter on ground

In Hospital

The FlightCare clinical team will help prepare the patient for transport once they arrive at the referring facility. Oftentimes, the most critical patients we transport need to be maintained on a variety of complex medications and other life support systems such as ventilators and pumps. The clinical team is trained to carefully assess the patient’s current condition to ensure that all necessary items are in place during transport. The clinical team will make sure that each and every patient is cared for in the best possible manner and transported safely to the receiving hospital.

Interfacility details needed when calling Dispatch:

  • Call 1-800-367-3822
  • Requestors Name
  • Type of Patient
  • Age of Patient
  • Weight of Patient
  • Medications
  • Call Back Number
  • Receiving Hospital (Not required, please refer to early activation)

Patient Preparation Instructions Interfacility:

Call early! 1-800-367-3822

  • Early notification allows the pilots to initiate required weather checks and other pre-flight procedures which will save valuable time.
  • Be prepared to provide the potential destination location. This will assist the pilot when conducting weather and fuel planning.
  • For Interfacility transports, we do not require a receiving hospital prior to the helicopters arrival. However, due to weather, Pilots may not be able accept or deny a flight without knowing a potential destination.

In addition to general preparation:

  • Ensure patient is adequately immobilized.
  • Consider the placement of an ETT, if appropriate.
  • Consider having blood ready for transport, if appropriate.

General preparation once FlightCare has been dispatched:

  • Complete all transfer paperwork.
  • Copy chart, x-rays and all other studies.
  • Provide two copies of face sheet, pertinent labs, ED Notes.
  • Update FlightCare team with any new or updated information.

Ensure patient and well secured IV access:

  • For unstable patients: 2 large-bore peripheral lines are preferred.

Medications:

  • Provide pain medications as indicated by the patient’s condition.
  • Provide anti-emetic medications as indicated by the patient’s condition or if the patient has a history of motion sickness.

On FlightCare arrival, be prepared to provide report on:

  • Past medical history
  • Brief summary of the history or hospital course
  • Allergies
  • Medications given
  • Assign a staff member to be available to assist with patient packaging
  • Have paperwork and x-rays ready to go

If the patient has an advanced airway in place:

  • Provide the most recent chest x-ray and arterial blood gas available for the team to review.
  • Insert an oro-gastric or naso-gastric tube.
  • Have an appropriate staff member available to brief transport team on ventilator settings and other issues.

Pediatric Patient

In addition to general preparation:

  • Maintain normo-thermia with appropriate warming or cooling measures.
  • Check blood sugar within one hour of the transfer or more frequently as diagnosis dictates.
  • Ensure adequate IV access with maintenance IV fluid infusion.
  • For patient with advanced airways, ensure adequate head and neck immobilization to provide adequate stability of advanced airway.

FlightCare Helicopter on scene of accident

On Scene

The FlightCare team will help prepare patients for transport once they arrive on-scene. However, one key benefit of air medical transportation is rapid access to care. Patient preparation prior to FlightCare’s arrival can decrease on-scene time which will ultimately reduce time to the closest, most appropriate facility.

Scene details needed when calling Dispatch:

  • Requestors name and agency
  • Type of incident
  • Approximate patient weight
  • Location including nearest cross street
  • Call back number
  • Ground contact
  • Radio frequency

Patient Preparation Instructions for Scene Accidents

Call early!

  • Early notification allows the pilots to initiate required weather checks and other pre-flight procedures which will save valuable time.
  • Be prepared to provide the destination location. This will assist the pilot when conducting weather and fuel planning.

Patient Preparation:

  • Airway Management. If you’re in doubt, intubate.
  • Oxygen Therapy.
  • Intravenous lines. We recommend at least two intravenous lines be established. Trauma patients should have two large-bore intravenous lines. Medical patients should have two intravenous lines, one attached to an IV set and additional lines turned into saline locks for transport.
  • Tubes. A naso-gastic tube should be placed to prevent gastric dilation and respiratory compromise, when able.
  • Spinal immobilization. This is a vitally important piece with a trauma patient. If possible, pad all pressure points on the spine board for comfort.
  • Splinting. For all long bones or open fractures, place a pelvic binder if there is a suspected pelvic fracture.
  • Restraint and sedation. Due to safety, the flight medical team may use chemicals or physical restraints for patients who are combative. Anxious patients may also be sedated.
  • Family. Family cannot fly in the helicopter.
  • Assisting our team. Please allow our team to direct you before offering assistance and be sure that non-essential personnel do not approach the helicopter.